How did Tutankhamun die?

Tutankhamun is the most famous Egyptian pharaoh. Spectacularly his almost intact tomb was discovered in the Valley of the Kings on November 4th 1922 by British archaeologists Howard Carter and Lord Carnavon but how did he die?

Tutankhamun broke his leg in a hunting accident. That same hunting accident might also have caused the skull fracture that was discovered. During an x-ray of the mummy in 1968, scientists found bone fragments in Tut’s skull, prompting a theory that the boy king had been bludgeoned to death. It is believed he reigned for around 9 years, making him about about 18 when he died.
Others believe King Tut broke his leg as the result of a disease, with diseases like temporal lobe epilepsy, a combination of malaria and leimyoma or even polio being named as the potential killer.

According to National Geographic (December 2006) a new CT scan of King Tutankhamen’s mummy “showed a thin coating of embalming resin around the leg break, suggesting that Tut broke his leg just before he died and that his death may have been the result from an infection or other complications.
He most likely died from a broken leg which became infected. After all these years, it’s unlikely we’ll be able to establish the cause of death with 100% certainty.
Some people believe he was murdered, while others believe he died from the infection of a broken leg. Others speculate that a disease killed him.
The killer disease might have been temporal lobe epilepsy, a combination of malaria and leimyoma or even polio.

Tutankhamun died suddenly so his burial was arranged in haste. He was buried in a hastily prepared tomb in the Valley Of The Kings at Thebes, the traditional burial place of his predecessors. The person responsible for his burial, and shown on one of the walls in Tutankhamuns tomb was Ay who succeeded him on the Egyptian throne. The Valley of the Kings in Upper Egypt contains many of the tombs of pharaohs from the New Kingdom, Including Ramesses the Great. The small tomb contained hundreds of objects (now housed in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo) many richly decorated and covered in gold, that supposedly would be needed by the king in his afterlife.  Over 3000 treasures were placed in the tomb to help Tutankhamun in his afterlife, and the walls of the burial chamber were painted with scenes of his voyage to the afterworld.

Legend has it, anyone who dares to open the tomb will suffer the wrath of the mummy. After all these years, it’s unlikely we’ll be able to establish the cause of death with 100% certainty.